Johnny Cash – From Memphis to Hollywood: Bootleg Vol. 2 (+ Giveaway X 2)

Do you like Johnny Cash? Hell I love Johnny Cash, and I was still not aware that this was coming out. It’s another collection from those promised Johnny Cash archives that started with Personal File (which they now call Bootleg Vol. 1). Personal File featured 2 discs of demos from the 70’s, and is well worth getting if you are a Johnny Cash fanatic like I am. This one however really starts to get into the proverbial meat and potatoes of Johnny Cash rarities.

What we have here is disc one featuring a live show, demos and rarities from the 50’s Sun era, and disc two featuring rarities from the 60s Columbia era. Some of these demos are pretty stark, featuring just Johnny and a guitar evoking the stipped down American Recordings from late in his career. The sun demos are particulary worthwhile, just listen to the demo version of Walk The Line: [content removed per request]

Disc two is not without it’s gems either, probably the most interesting song on the whole collection is the theme song to the James Bond movie Thunderball (<click that for an idea of what the JC intro would have looked like). Of course it wasn’t used and a Tom Jones song was used instead, don’t think it would have fit the movie but a cool addition to the Johnny Cash catalog. Probably my favorite song on this set is The Folk Singer, co-written with Charlie Daniels and released as a B-side to the live version of Folsom Prison Blues in ‘68 (the recording credited with re-surging his career in  the late 60’s). Give it a listen, such a great song and great to finally hear it: [content removed per request]

Now for the next part of this, the folks at Columbia Legacy (for some reason) have given me a prize pack to give away that consists of  the Bootleg Vol. 2 CD, poster and T-shirt, American IV: The Man Comes Around CD, and American V: A Hundred Highways CD. That’s the first prize pack, the second prize pack is a copy of Bootleg Vol. 1 on CD, the one known as Personal File. All you have to do is leave a comment talking about some memory of  Johnny Cash, for instance I remember as a kid sitting with my Grandfather watching Johnny Cash on Hee-Haw, not even sure the song but I vividly remember that memory. Another is I remember driving to work the day Johnny Cash died and the DJ played the song Tears in The Hoston River…let me tell you there were tears in the Nissan Sentra as well friends! Make sure to put an email which you can be reached at, and I will pick the two winners randomly.

From Memphis to Hollywood: Bootleg Vol. 2 comes out tomorrow, the 22nd. I will draw the winner on Saturday the 26th (Johnny Cash’s birthday) at 10 pm EST.

  • danny

    February 21st, 2011

    Reply

    I teared up watching the video for “Hurt” the first time. I can’t explain it. I don’t even cry at funerals.

  • Andy Washington

    February 21st, 2011

    Reply

    I saw him play once in London. 1990 – way before it was cool to like him. June & him played to 1000 Irish cowboys in hats & all, & a couple of indie boys inc me. It was wondrous & changed my life

  • Kevin Jackson

    February 21st, 2011

    Reply

    My earliest memory of Johnny Cash is my dad listening to Cash tapes in his truck as we’d drive around. The first time I heard Ring of Fire was an epiphany for me and his songs bring back many happy memories of me and my dad. I was a fan from that first song and I am not ashamed to say I cried like a child when he died. It was like losing a grandparent. Miss you Johnny.

  • larry

    February 21st, 2011

    Reply

    we used to sing Johnny Cash songs in the football field house after practice in the early 70’s when it wasnt really cool because everybody was listening to rock

  • Mikel

    February 21st, 2011

    Reply

    The first concert I ever went to was Johnny Cash. I was 6 months old. My parents started me off right in loving good music! JC signed a poster for my Mother that sadly has disappeared.

  • Scott

    February 21st, 2011

    Reply

    Oh, this is so sad. As I remember, my first exposure to Johnny Cash was when I watched the Monkees on Johnn’s TV show. Well… the good side of this story is that I became a fan of Johnny Cash… through the Monkees.

  • M. S.

    February 21st, 2011

    Reply

    Man, where to begin. I’d say listening to ‘Sunday Morning Coming Down’ many a late ….wait for it…. Sunday morning, tooling down country Georgia roads, in my 1974 Toyota LandCruiser, as a teenager :^)

  • boyhowdy

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    Man…that’s some prize pack! My earliest recollection of loving Cash was surely dismissing Ring of Fire for the Mariachi horns to a friend in college…only to have the friend put the entire album on the player, and just say “this time, listen”.

  • Duncan Walls

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    I was 5 years old and I was listening to the radio. A LOT. I was also watching Dick Clark. EVERYDAY. I liked Rock ‘n’ Roll. My mom HATED Elvvis. Didn’t mind Buddy Holly, The Evrlys. I don’t know about Johnny Cash. I remember hearing Frank Dell on WGR-Am in Buffalo, NY playing ” Guess Things Happen This Way” and liking the “ba-du-ba-du” bass line. I went to see Frank Dell down at the plaza in the WGR trailer. I had to ride my bike a long way to get there. I asked him to play it again. When I got home my Mom got mad when I told her where I went. The next week I went to the drugstore near the trailer and went in and put a copy of the record under my shirt and rode away on my bike. My mom found the record a couple of weeks later and I cried and told her where I got it and made me go with my Dad and pay the man for it afterwards and tell him I was sorry. This is how my life as a music collector, musician and thief began. i am 59 and have never changed my ways ever since.

  • Martin Luther Presley

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    1. About this release

    I found about it by chance a few weeks back when I was searching for something completely different. And I too thought: How could I not know about this?? I was also freaked out that there was a Vol. 1 I had never heard of, but then found out it’s the ol’ Personal Files release (which I love). So, very much looking forward to this one!

    2. Cash memory

    So I’m German and born in 1982 and even though as far as I know Germany has always been very kind to Cash even during the 1980s it was rather unusual for a kid like me to dig Cash. It all started when I was about eight years old and my aunt died. I got some of her records, most of them were greek folklore music for some reason and they were pretty much useless to me; some Beatles LPs which didn’t mean that much to me (even though I was mostly listening to 60s stuff); and AMERICA: A 200 YEAR SALUTE IN STORY AND SONG. Man, I loved that record and everything about it. I didn’t understand a word, but still tried to read along (thankfully the spoken word parts were printed in the gatefold cover), and I stared at that cool log cabin on the cover for hours. I still do as a matter of fact. I’d choose a cabin in the woods, some old stories and a Cash record over any fancy 21st century luxurious palace, I tell you. So, yeah, you could say Cash left a pretty huge impression on this here German boy.

    unclemeat@web.de

  • Bruce

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    I remember riding in my uncle’s car when I was a child. He only had two 8-track tapes in the car. One was Paranoid by Black Sabbath. The other was Johnny Cash At Folsom Prison.

  • Josh Buschkopf

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    I remember the day Johnny Cash died, and that as sad as I was for the loss, I was almost as sad for the fact that as far as the local top 40 pop country radio station was concerned, it was almost like nothing had happened.

  • Brett

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    I remember quite clearly the day that he died…

    It was raining here in WI and once I heard the news, I went out on my covered back deck where I had a CD player and commenced to listen to American IV over and over and just sit there. I did that for a few hours and then switched to Folsom and San Quentin. It was a sad day.

  • DG

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    I share no musical taste with my father. None. Zero. Except for Johnny Cash, that is.

  • John

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    Johnny Cash helped me get out of prision.

    Pick me.

    John

  • riley

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    Spring 1968, I’d saved my Christmas money to go see Cash at Topeka Municipal Auditorium. A whole 3 bucks which was a lot for a 12 year old. Mother Maybelle was sick but June and Johnny were great. I was never shy about going back stage and got Johnny’s autograph which I still have. Ring of Fire & Jackson blew me away.

  • Jeff Surfus

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    My early memory of Johnny Cash is when “Folsom Prison Blues” was all over the radio, including rock and roll radio. My brother and I memorized the song and used to perform it for our family over and over again, including playing “air guitar” and “air piano”. We did the same thing later on with “A Boy Named Sue.”…..Good times!

  • ro

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    My black pickup is known as “The Johnny Cash Truck”

  • Brocephus

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    I remember seeing Mr. Cash on the Muppets, many years ago. He is truly an American icon.

  • mr blur

    February 22nd, 2011

    Reply

    well now. my first record ever was a gift from my parents, johnny cash at folsom prison. and the one night a week we were allowed to stay up late was to watch the johnny cah show on tv. bob dylan came on and they sang girl from the north country.

    I thought I had died and gone to heaven. and merely a sprout at that.

  • jeff

    February 23rd, 2011

    Reply

    first memory… Johnny “Trash” and Oscar singing “Nasty Dan”…

    last memory… driving all the way to my dads to show him the bonus dvd video of hurt…

  • Bas

    February 23rd, 2011

    Reply

    I love Johnny Cash. He opened a new world of music to me.

    I can still remember watching this video for the fist time (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=razI4E1qUYc). Like said before, I don’t cry at funerals, but seeing Johnny like that and still performing hit me hard.
    Sunday morning coming down in this vid (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMQ9b_IXi18&feature=related) is the hardest to watch without crying.

    Damn… why is he gone :’(

  • Dave

    February 23rd, 2011

    Reply

    When I was about 5 years old (1968 or ‘69), my dad brought home our first record player. It wasn’t a stereo system console–just a single record player, probably from Sears, that was a grayish plastic with a lid that closed. Soon afterward, my folks got records from a friend or relative…they just appeared one day in the living room next to the player. I recall a Jim Nabors album (“Gomer Pyle!” I recognized), and a couple of 45s: Elvis’ “Ain’t That Lovin’ You Baby” and the Four Seasons’ “Let’s Hang On.”

    And an album by a dark-haired man whom I later learned was Johnny Cash. I’m sure I couldn’t read the titles yet. When a neighbor one day came by and happened to check out our new player, he immediately put on this album and proceeded to sing the line from “Folsom Prison Blues” that gripped me immediately:

    “But I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die.”

    As a 5-year-old Iowa farm kid, I knew this was no ordinary song, that it was somehow more powerful than anything I’d heard my mom hum while doing the dishes. It was frightening and thrilling at the same time. Singing about shooting a man–just for the heck of it?! And with that chugging rhythm and that booming voice, I was mesmerized. I played it over and over afterwards, listening closely to all the words, assuming the story was true, wondering who this man was on the album cover with the strong features and the steely gaze.

    I’ve never forgotten that memory. Never will.

  • Dan

    February 23rd, 2011

    Reply

    My Johnny Cash memory will always be of my 3 year old (at the time) god-daughter Sadie always wanting to dance to Johnny Cash. Didn’t matter if it was a danceable song or not — Johnny Cash was singing for her to dance.

  • Donald

    February 23rd, 2011

    Reply

    My first memory of Johnny Cash…my dad, who was a musician, took me to a small Texas border town for a performance, and my life changed…The first time I heard Johnny Cash sing “I Walk the Line…” O, wait. That was Rodney Crowell, not me.

    The first time I heard Johnny Cash, I was in a ‘73 Buick LeSabre with my family of 7. We were on a family holiday to Oregon, a two-day drive from Alberta. We were going to visit Grandma. The eight-track player selection in that green beast included studio bands covering the hits of Simon and Garfunkel, Anne Murray, and Gordon Lightfoot. We also had a tape of Marie Osmond songs (“Paper Roses”) and a Johnny Cash tape. It was called The Rambler and included dramatic, spoken word interludes that formed the narrative binding the songs. I don’t remember the details, but I recall being impressed by the voice, whether it was my turn to sit on the seat or if it was my turn to sit on the floor. Good times- 90 degrees, driving all day, a brother with gas, and a sister who always got her way. My best memory? Hearing Johnny Cash. (And if I win, I already have Bootleg 1, so pass it onto someone else, okay.) Best, Donald

  • John Tuson

    February 23rd, 2011

    Reply

    I was 18, just left school, on a year out before going to university. I was very cool. I had a job in a record shop, and was able to inflict my music on the world: punk, indie rock, grebo. This was what real music was! Then two records – new releases that caught my eye – changed my taste for ever. One was Green on Red’s “Here Come The Snakes” – a fine record, but what was this song ‘We Had It All’? Just extraordinary. Time to investigate Waylon jennings, and Billy-Joe Shaver. And then a compilation – “Til Things Are Brighter”. Johnny Cash? No thanks. But here was Mary Mary out of the Gaye Bykers on Acid, and David McComb out of the Triffids. Worth a listen. And then the songs began to inveigle themselves into my heart. Time to buy some Cash. My dad knew these songs. Even so, they were brilliant. Time to hunt in second hand stores. The album “Rainbow”. Horrible production. kitsch cover. But the sound of Cash! And he was playing, soon, in a holiday camp in the faded south coast english town where I lived. Dad and i got tickets – even though they were supposed to be only for attendees at a Western theme weekend. ‘Ladies and Gentleman, will you please remove your stetsons so those behind you can see’. Accountants from north london took off their headgear. Out came Cash, and June. One 19 year old in the audience realised that this was rather better than Ned’s Atomic Dustbin. Cash’d get trendy, of course, and release better albums than ‘Rainbow’. Next time I saw him the crowd had no stetsons. But nothing could surpass Bognor Regis Butlin’s. I’d never go to another concert with my dad either.

  • PeterJ

    February 23rd, 2011

    Reply

    As I started getting into vinyl again, Johnny Cash Live at Folsom Prison and Live at San Quentin were the first two albums I went out and bought. Dude is bad ass, pure American rock ‘n’ roll.

  • Elle

    February 24th, 2011

    Reply

    My parents didn’t buy many records during the years they were raising children, but Dad had a couple of Johnny Cash albums that he’d even play from time to time — at least until us kids scratched the hell out of them when we learned how to work the record player ourselves. Dad was a fan of old-school country music, especially Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, and George Jones. I appreciate the talents of the Hag and old “no-show Jones” (as Dad sometimes called him) but neither of them are as tangled with my memories of my dad the way Johnny Cash is. I miss them both.

    I recently watched the 2-disc DVD collection of the best moments of The Johnny Cash TV Show, and the sweet nostalgia overwhelmed me. I developed a whole new appreciation for Cash — and I was already a fan.

  • Dave

    February 25th, 2011

    Reply

    While dating my (now) wife in high school, I used to hang out at her house and we’d have campfires. Her brother and grandpa (who looked/sounded like Johnny Cash) would play old country songs and we’d all sing along and have a great time.

    I joined the military and took her away to Colorado and then Italy and he got really sick while we were there. We flew back home and he was still playing, oxygen tank & bottle of Jim Beam at his side. He died a few weeks later after we moved back, but I’ll never forget him.

    He inspired me to take up guitar and my wife loves when I sing those old songs her grandpa & brother used to sing.

    Live at Folsom is the best live album and I think best album period! I never grow sick of that…I’ve been trying to track down a decent used copy on vinyl.

  • Eric

    February 26th, 2011

    Reply

    I remember going to the dump with my Dad in his beat up ex-Texaco ‘52 Ford Pickup and hearing “I Walk The Line” on the AM radio. On these trips to the dump my Dad would always share his Wintergreen Life Savers with me. To this day when I hear that song I think of Wintergreen.

  • A. R.

    February 26th, 2011

    Reply

    My Grandma’s late 70s era powder blue jacket that had “Johnny Cash Live” across the back. It was her favorite jacket back in the day. Then I found At Folsom Prison in a box of LPs next to her stereo. Still has perfect scratches and pops today.

    She introduced me to a lot of great classic country music and Johnny Cash was just the beginning.

  • Matt

    February 26th, 2011

    Reply

    alright, great stories all. This is closed now. Announcement of winners shortly

  • Poetry

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    Reply

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